American Voters Unhappy With The Presidential Choices

Venkata Kondubhatla 

Washington DC: The presidential elections are fast coming, less than two month away. Yet a large section of voters haven’t decided whom to vote for. This is not abnormal in elections, but this season the undecided figures seem to be larger than ever. 

For one, the voters are unhappy with their choices. They strongly dislike both the presidential candidates. A survey says the number of voters satisfied with the choices have dropped by 7 percent since June 2016. 

In the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center, only a third of the registered voters say they are fairly satisfied with the choices, while 63 percent say they are not too or not at all satisfied. The survey was conducted from August 23rd to September 2nd and 1201 adults, including 947 registered voters, participated. 

The dissatisfaction is across all the partisan lines. 

According to the survey, only 36 percent of the Republicans or inclined toward the party, and 35 percent of Democrats or its leaners say they are satisfied. 

This trend is unusual in the past presidential elections. The unhappiness had dropped or had remained steady as the elections approached.

But the opposite seemed to happen this season. 

In the last season, 54 percent of the registered voters said they were satisfied with the candidate choices and little had changed from June of that year. 

This season is different from the previous ones. 

The candidates Barrack Obama and John McCain had their issues. Obama was running for the second term. His push for immigration reforms and withdrawal from Iraq had met opposition. McCain had issues with his vice president choice Sarah Palin, who was disliked for her popular gaffes. 

But both the candidates of 2012 have enjoyed the general acceptance of the voters. The voters’ indecisiveness was based on the policy issues rather than being stuck with two bad choices, which seems to be the case with the present election. 

The 2016 nominees, unlike their previous ones, don’t meet the presidential standards. 

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are criticized for not being transparent. For instance, Trump hasn’t released his tax returns yet, and Clinton is under fire for not disclosing until her collapse that she was diagnosed with pneumonia. 

Trump is less revealed to the public. His past as a businessman is less known to the voters. His business dealings with Russian oligarchies cannot be entangled and risks his trust among voters, just like the emails scam and the fraud investments in Clinton Foundation does to Clinton. 

While Trump’s controversial gaffes make him temperamentally unfit for presidency, the scams are encumbering Hillary meet the standards of the presidential nominee.

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